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3251 The Credit Woodlands, Mississauga, ON L5C2J7
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Early Years
 

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Using social media safely

Using social media safely

With the growing number of social media sites, it is no surprise that social media is the most common form of communication for children and teenagers. Posts, status updates, comments, instant messages, video uploads, tweets and texts have become a regular part of their lives. While there are many positive benefits to using social media, including staying connected with friends and expressing your interests, students must be cautious in their use of these networks.

Among the most popular social media platforms used are Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat, Instagram, YouTube and Whatsapp Messenger. Many of these platforms are free and are available on smartphones and other electronic devices. These platforms are easy to navigate and often allow information to be shared instantly, not only with friends, but with strangers. On social media, it is important to remember that the world is watching.

Here are some tips, provided by the Canadian Safe School Network and GetSafeOnline.org, to keep your children safe and help them make smart choices when using social media:

  • Set some boundaries for your child before they get their first 'connected device' (mobile, tablet, laptop or games console). Once they have it, it can be more difficult to change the way they use it or the settings.
  • Have a conversation about what is appropriate online behaviour and what actions could have huge repercussions that could damage their reputation and be harmful to others.
  • Talk to your child about the kind of websites they look at. Encourage them to speak to you if they come across something they find worrying or upsetting on websites, games or social media.
  • Discuss with your child what is safe and appropriate to post and share online. Written comments, photos and videos all form part of their 'digital footprint' and could be seen by anyone and available on the internet forever, even if it is subsequently deleted.
  • Explain to your child that being online doesn't give them anonymity or protection, and that they shouldn't do anything online that they wouldn't do face-to-face. Users should only accept people they know in order to protect themselves from spammers, strangers and others who may be using social networking sites to commit crimes.
  • Unlike when they're meeting someone face-to-face, children don't always know who they're actually 'talking' to online, even if they think they do. Tell your children they must never email, chat, or text with strangers, and it's never okay to meet a stranger in the real world.
  • Ensure your children set their privacy settings appropriately. Take the time to learn how privacy settings work on your children's favourite sites, and teach them how to control their privacy.
  • Tell your children never to share personal and private information with anyone online. This includes, but is not limited to, his or her full name, age, birth date, address, phone number, social insurance number, credit card information and  parents' full names.
  • Limit the amount of time that your children spend on social media platforms and talk about the importance of healthy and appropriate use of technology.
What you need to know about head lice

What you need to know about head lice

What is head lice?

Head lice are tiny insects that live on the scalp where they lay their eggs. They have three stages: the egg (nit), the nymph and the adult. Head lice do not spread diseases and cannot be spread between animals or pets and humans, only through direct contact between people.

Head lice spread easily, especially where people are in close contact. They are common among school-aged children or children attending child care, where they spread through direct hair-to-hair contact or directly by sharing things like hats, combs, hairbrushes or headphones.

One of the first signs of head lice is an itchy scalp. However, children can have head lice for several weeks with no symptoms. If you think your child has head lice, check their hair for nits right away, then again after one week and after two weeks.

 

What to do if your child has lice

If you discover your child has lice, notify the school immediately so that classmates can be checked.  Parents must keep their child at home until they have been treated for lice and are nit-free. Students may only return to school if they are "nit-free" and will be checked by a school administrator before being re-admitted to class.  If your child has live lice, ensure they avoid head-to-head contact with other children until the lice are gone. Children should not share combs, hairbrushes, caps, hats or hair ornaments. You should also check all family members for head lice. Be sensitive to your child's feelings and let them know that having head lice does not mean they are not clean.

Head lice can be treated with the following approved insecticides:

  • pyrethrin (found in R&C Shampoo + Conditioner)
  • permethrin (Nix Creme Rinse or Kwellada-P Creme Rinse)
  • lindane (Hexit Shampoo or PMS-Lindane Shampoo)

Although head lice does not pose a significant health risk, it is highly contagious and very uncomfortable for children, therefore schools take precautions to prevent the spread.  Your cooperation in controlling the spread of lice by keeping your child at home until they have been treated and are nit-free is much appreciated.

How to report absences when School Messenger is experiencing technical issues

How to report absences when School Messenger is experiencing technical issues

​Recently before the Winter break, the SafeArrival system, provided by School Messenger, experienced problems reporting absences through the App and website. While School Messenger works diligently to fix any technical issues, parents/guardians are reminded that absences can always be reported by calling the School Messenger toll-free number 1-855-209-6155 even when the App and website are inaccessible.

What you need to know about the 2018 interim Health and Physical Education (HPE) elementary curriculum

What you need to know about the 2018 interim Health and Physical Education (HPE) elementary curriculum

The Ministry of Education's 2018 interim Health and Physical Education (HPE) elementary curriculum, which came into effect in September 2018, includes changes to the section on Human Growth and Development. No changes were made to the secondary HPE curriculum.​
The Attitude of Gratitude

The Attitude of Gratitude

The Attitude of Gratitude

From the PDSB Mental Health Resource Team

What is Gratitude?

Gratitude is all about focusing on what's good in your life. It is paying attention to the things that we can sometimes take for granted, especially when we are feeling stressed. There are many different words that can describe feelings of gratitude, including feeling thankful, lucky, or fortunate. An attitude of gratitude involves actively choosing to acknowledge and appreciate the things you are thankful for in life. By making a focused effort to reflect on the positive parts of your day, the stressors you face can begin to feel a little less overwhelming.

Why Does Gratitude Matter?

Practicing an attitude of gratitude can make a BIG difference on your overall outlook on life. Gratitude has been shown to BOOST both physical and mental health outcomes by helping people to:

  • Improve their self-worth and esteem
  • Balance their negative emotions
  • Experience other positive emotions linked with gratitude (e.g., happiness) 
  • Build better relationships with others

Give Gratitude A Go

Feel like an attitude of gratitude could benefit your family? Here are a few suggestions to get you started!

1. Keep a Journal: Each family member should write down three things they are thankful for each day (big or small). As a family, make a little time each week to review some of the entries. When an individual family member feels stressed or overwhelmed, encourage them to reflect on their recent journal entries.

2. Create a Photo Album: Take photos of things that make you and your family happy. Regularly add the photos to an album. Schedule a little relaxation time each week to review your entries.

3. Fill a Jar: Reflect on the things you and your family members are grateful for at the end of each day. For each reflection, add a marble to a jar to symbolize your gratitude. Monitor how long it takes to fill the jar.

4. Pay It Forward: Put together a gratitude box for someone else...why not one for each family member? On colourful pieces of paper, write several entries to let the person know what you appreciate about them. Try: 'Thank you for…' or 'I love you because….' Once the box is complete, wrap it and present it as a gift.

5. Say Thank You: As often as you can! Make a concerted effort to say thank you to other people. By thanking others, you will begin to notice things that you appreciate in the moment.

Remember! 

Like any skill, gratitude is one that needs to be practiced. Anyone who spends time with children and youth knows that they are are mimics and they learn by watching how we deal with life's stresses and opportunities. By mindfully modelling gratitude and bringing our children and youth into this practice, we are promoting their healthy development for life!

For updates and to follow along with the work of the PDSB Mental Health Resource Team, find them on Twitter @MHRTPeel.

 

Adapted from Reach Out Australia (2018) and The Optimistic Child (1995).

Time for school - A parent's guide to reporting school absences

Time for school - A parent's guide to reporting school absences

All parents/guardians of elementary students need to report their children's absences or late arrivals from school via our automated School Messenger SafeArrival system.

 

Use one of the following methods to set-up your new SafeArrival account. Please ensure the number and email address that you are using to report your child's absences are those that we have on file at the school.

 

SchoolMessenger app (free from Apple or Google Play)

  1. Download the SchoolMessenger app

  2. Tap Sign Up to create your account

 

Web and Mobile Web:  go.schoolmessenger.ca

  1. Go to the above website
  2. Click Sign Up to create your account

 

Interactive Toll-free Phone

  1. Call the toll-free number:  1-855-209-6155
  2. Listen to and follow the instructions to report an absence

 

As always, please report your child's absences before the start of the school day. Late arrivals and/or early departures should be reported as soon as possible. If your child's absence is not reported in advance, the automated notification system will contact you and will provide an opportunity to verify the absence. By reporting your child absent in advance on the SafeArrival toll-free number, website or SchoolMessenger mobile app, you will not receive a call.

 

As always, if you have any questions or require any assistance, please contact the school. 

Community corner

Community corner

Stay up-to-date with community-based opportunities

The Peel District School Board is pleased to introduce an electronic resource page on www.peelschools.org called, Community Corner, which contains links to information and resources in the community that may be of interest to students and their families. This site replaces our previous method of sending promotional materials about community clubs, camps, contests, fundraisers and events home with students on a regular basis.

How you can access Community Corner

  1. Visit www.peelschools.org/parents/communitycorner

 

  1. Click on the "Community Corner"  button, found on the main page of school websites, as well as on www.peelschools.org
Traffic safety in our community

Traffic safety in our community

Safety is a top priority at our school. Here is a list of traffic tips to keep students, staff and parents safe while commuting to and from school.
Respect traffic signs and road markers around the school. 

  • Drive slowly and with caution on and near school property. Adhere to the posted speed limits on any surrounding streets used by students on their way to and from school.
  • Always yield to pedestrian traffic. Wait for students, staff members and parents to cross before driving past them.
  • When dropping your child off at the school, use the Kiss'n'Ride area. This is a supervised area that is designed to keep students safe.
  • Do not double park or do anything else to block traffic or draw your child off the curb and into traffic. Do not take shortcuts over curbs.
  • Have your child ready to exit the car when you reach the curb. Say goodbye to your child before you park at the curb to let your child out of your car.
  • During regular drop-off times, students are to remain in the car until it is safe for them to exit the car onto the curb.
  • Follow the directions of staff or volunteers on duty in the school parking lot and treat staff, students, volunteers, passengers and other drivers with respect.
  • Consider parking off site and walking a short distance to school. This will give you time to talk to your children about their day, review new vocabulary words, math concepts, etc.
  • Remind your child to only cross the street at an intersection or crosswalk. They should never "jaywalk" by crossing in the middle of the street.
  • Students who bike to school should always wear a helmet, and follow all traffic laws. They should only cross the street at a crosswalk or intersection—never in the middle of the road.
On the road again—how to keep your cyclist safe

On the road again—how to keep your cyclist safe

​Here are some tips you can review with your child to ensure bike season gets off to a great start:

Promoting Wellbeing in Your Children This Summer: The Importance of Structure

Promoting Wellbeing in Your Children This Summer: The Importance of Structure

​Summer vacation is almost here! Children can barely wait to put away their backpacks and spend their days free. Although this might be true for many, children and parents rely on structure to help guide the day, even in the summer. Structure holds kids and allows them to feel safe, knowing what to expect throughout the day and the week. Although it is crucial for children to have unstructured, free time each day, it is important for there to be some routine and structure (however you define it) to help children manage their emotions. Parents and children should sit down and discuss the summer plans, whether it is camp every day or multiple weeks off in a row, kids need to know what to expect.

 
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